• January
    • 1st – New Year’s Day
    • 25th – Burns’ Night (Scotland)
  • February
    • 14th – Valentine’s Day.
    • 17th – Shrove Tuesday or ‘Pancake Day’
    • 19th – Chinese New Year.
  • March
    • 1st – St David’s Day (Wales).
    • 15th – Mother’s Day.
    • 17th – St Patrick’s Day (Northern Ireland).
  • April
    • 1st – April Fools’ Day.
    • 3rd–6th – Easter weekend.
    • 23rd – St George’s Day (England)
    • April 23 is also known as William Shakespeare’s birthday, when events take place to honour the playwright.
  • May
    • 1st – Beltane. Beltane (or Beltain) is the Celtic festival of fire, which celebrates fertility and marks the start of summer.
    • 4th and 25th – Bank holidays
  • June
    • 13th – The Queen’s Official Birthday.
    • 21st – Father’s Day.
    • 21st – Summer solstice.
    • 29th–July 12th – Wimbledon Tennis Championships.
  • July
    • 17th – Eid al-Fitr.
  • August
    • 1st–8th – Eisteddfod.
    • 7th–31st – Edinburgh Festival Fringe.
    • 18th–22nd – London Fashion Week.
    • 31st – Notting Hill Carnival.
  • September
    • 18th–22nd – London Fashion Week.
  • October
    • 31st – Halloween.
  • November
    • 5th – Bonfire night
    • 11th – Diwali
    • 11th – Remembrance Day.
    • 30th – St Andrew’s Day (Scotland).
  • December
    • Winter Wonderland in London’s Hyde Park. In addition to a traditional Christmas market, this huge site features carnival rides, two circuses, an ice skating rink, fake snow and an exhibition of ice sculptures… and enough hot chocolate and mulled wine to keep you warm.
    • Hogwarts at Christmas, a wintry version of the Harry Potter tour at Warner Bros. Studios in Leavesden (near London). Watch snow fall over the original model of Hogwarts castle, and see the Great Hall set for Christmas dinner.
    • Birmingham’s Frankfurt Christmas Market, the largest German market outside Germany and Austria, complete with glühwein (mulled wine), wursts (sausages), pretzels and sweet treats. You can also shop for unique gifts from local artists at the Craft Fair.
    • The winter festival at the Eden Project in Cornwall. Usually an educational ecology park, in December the Eden Project is transformed with Christmas trees, a choir, real reindeer and an ice rink, with ice skating classes for all ages.
    • Belfast’s Christmas Market. If you’re studying in Northern Ireland, visit the multicultural market outside Belfast’s City Hall for festive food and drink from around the world, crafts, gifts and Christmas decorations.
    • Pantomimes. The traditional Christmas ‘panto’ is a mix of slapstick comedy and musical theatre, with silly costumes and audience participation. Pantomimes are usually for children, but it’s worth seeing one for a uniquely British experience.
    • 6th–14th – Hanukkah.
    • 25th – Christmas.
    • 26th – Boxing Day.